Anunnaki gods list

  • Anu – God of the sky (all living animals)
  • Enlil – God of wind and earth
  • Enki – God of water and wisdom
  • Inanna – Goddess of love and war
  • Nergal – God of death and disease
  • Shamash – God of the sun and justice
  • Marduk – God of creation and patron deity of Babylon
  • Tiamat – Goddess of chaos and the primordial ocean
  • Ishtar – Goddess of love, fertility, and war
  • Ea – God of wisdom and magic
  • Ninurta – God of agriculture and hunting
  • Adad – God of storms and rain
  • Ashur – God of Assyria and patron deity of the Assyrian Empire
  • Baal – God of storms and fertility (worshiped in some Mesopotamian cultures)
  • Anshar – God of the horizon and father of Anu
  • Kishar – Goddess of the earth and mother of Anu
  • Dagan – God of agriculture, fertility, and the earth
  • Nanna – God of the moon and wisdom
  • Ningal – Goddess of the moon and fertility
  • Utu – God of the sun and justice
  • Antu – Goddess of the sky and wife of Anu
  • Lahmu and Lahamu – Primordial gods of the abyss and parents of Anshar and Kishar
  • Damkina – Goddess of the earth and mother of Marduk
  • Nabu – God of wisdom, writing, and scribes
  • Ninhursag – Goddess of fertility, childbirth, and motherhood
  • Ninkasi – Goddess of beer and brewing
  • Papsukkal – Messenger god and attendant of the gods
  • Shara – God of war and hunting
  • Sin – God of the moon and wisdom (worshiped in some Mesopotamian cultures)
  • Ninlil – Goddess of the wind and wife of Enlil
  • Dumuzid – God of vegetation, fertility, and the underworld
  • Gula – Goddess of healing and medicine
  • Namtar – God of death and fate
  • Shulgi – God of justice and patron deity of the city of Ur
  • Teshub – God of storms and weather (worshiped in some Mesopotamian cultures)
  • Zababa – God of war and patron deity of the city of Kish
  • Belit-ili – Goddess of love, fertility, and war (worshiped in some Mesopotamian cultures)
  • Girra – God of fire and metalworking
  • Kalkal – God of agriculture and irrigation
  • Kuski-banda – God of healing and divination
  • Ninazu – God of the underworld and healing
  • Ningizzida – God of fertility, healing, and magic
  • Nusku – God of fire, light, and the hearth
  • Tammuz – God of vegetation, agriculture, and shepherds
  • Enbilulu – God of rivers and canals
  • Mami – Goddess of destiny, childbirth, and fertility
  • Ningal – Goddess of the moon and fertility
  • Ninshubur – Gender-fluid deity who was the messenger and companion of Inanna
  • Shara – God of war, hunting, and archery
  • Shullat and Hanish – Twin deities who guarded the gates of the underworld
  • Utnapishtim – Human who was granted immortality by the gods and survived the Great Flood
  • Ashnan – Goddess of grain and bread
  • Bel – God of the earth, fertility, and crops
  • Geshtinanna – Goddess of agriculture, fertility, and dreams
  • Khepri – God of creation and the sunrise (worshiped in some Mesopotamian cultures)
  • Mummu – Primordial deity of chaos and formlessness
  • Nidaba – Goddess of writing, accounting, and grain
  • Ninmah – Goddess of creation and healing
  • Uras – God of justice and the city of Nippur
  • Ziusudra – Human hero who survived the Great Flood and was granted immortality by the gods
  • Ellil – God of the sky, wind, and earth
  • Inana – Goddess of love, fertility, and war
  • Ishkur – God of thunderstorms and rain
  • Martu – God of the west and the desert
  • Nanshe – Goddess of water, fertility, and prophecy
  • Ninazu – God of the underworld and healing
  • Ninti – Goddess of life, childbirth, and the rib (in some versions of Mesopotamian myth, Ninti was created by the god Enki to heal the god of the sky, Anu, after he was injured)
  • Ninurta – God of agriculture, hunting, and war
  • Shamash – God of the sun, justice, and truth
  • Adad – God of thunder and storms
  • Anunitu – Goddess of the moon and the evening star
  • Ashur – God of war and the patron deity of the Assyrian empire
  • Dagan – God of agriculture, fertility, and grain
  • Enbilulu – God of water, rivers, and canals
  • Ennugi – God of irrigation and canals
  • Ereshkigal – Goddess of the underworld and death
  • Lahmu and Lahamu – Twin deities who represented the chaos of the primordial universe
  • Marduk – God of the city of Babylon and the patron deity of the Babylonian empire
  • Nabu – God of wisdom, writing, and scribes

Family tree of the deities of Annunaki

I also asked ChatGPT to make a chart of all the lords mentioned in Sumerian tablets:

Based on the list of dieties:

  • Anshar – God of the horizon and father of Anu
  • Kishar – Goddess of the earth and mother of Anu

  • Anu – God of the sky
  • Antu – Goddess of the sky and wife of Anu

  • Enlil – God of wind and earth – Son of Anu
  • Ninlil – Goddess of the wind and wife of Enlil
  • Ea – God of wisdom and magic – Son of Anu

Anshar and Kishar

Anshar and Kishar are two deities in the Babylonian creation myth known as the Enuma Elish. They are the parents of the god Anu, who becomes the god of the sky and the supreme deity in the Babylonian pantheon.

Anshar and Kishar are both considered to be primordial deities, who emerged from the chaos that existed before the creation of the universe. Anshar is often described as the god of the horizon or the god of the expanse, while Kishar is associated with the earth or the abyss.

According to the Enuma Elish, the god Tiamat, who represents the primeval chaos, becomes enraged at the behavior of the younger gods and decides to destroy them. Anu, their son, seeks help from Anshar, who sends him to his son Marduk, another younger god, to seek his aid in defeating Tiamat. Marduk agrees to help and is ultimately successful in defeating Tiamat, with Anshar and Kishar playing a supporting role in the story.

Anshar and Kishar are not as well-known or widely worshiped as some of the other deities in the Babylonian pantheon, but their role in the creation myth is significant in establishing the lineage of the gods and the emergence of order from chaos.

An excerpt from Tablet 1 of the Enuma Elish, translated by Stephanie Dalley:

“When the heights above were not named, Nor the earth below pronounced by name, Apsu, the first one, their begetter, And maker Tiamat, who bore them all, Had mixed their waters together, But had not formed pastures, nor discovered reed-beds; When yet no gods were manifest, Nor names pronounced, nor destinies decreed, Then gods were born within them.”

Later in the same tablet, Anshar and Kishar are mentioned as follows:

“Long were the days without end. Anu was their heir, the first among them; Anshar was the second, and Kishar was the third. Anu begot Nudimmud in his likeness; This Nudimmud was of his father Anu. Nudimmud begot Marduk, the master of the Igigi.”

When I asked for more information, I got this repond:

In some versions of the creation myth, Anshar and Kishar are described as being the children of the primordial gods Lahmu and Lahamu, further underscoring their status as primordial deities.

So, who are Lahmu and Lahamu?

Lahmu and Lahamu are ancient Mesopotamian deities who play a role in the Babylonian creation myth known as the Enuma Elish. According to the myth, they are the first of the primordial deities to emerge from the chaos of the universe, born from the union of the fresh waters of the Abzu and the salt waters of the Tiamat. Lahmu and Lahamu are often depicted as being the parents of Anshar and Kishar, who in turn give birth to the god Anu, the supreme deity in the Babylonian pantheon.

In Babylonian art, Lahmu and Lahamu are often depicted as bearded men or dragons, and are sometimes shown holding various symbols of power and authority. They were revered as powerful deities who helped to establish the order of the cosmos, and were often associated with the concepts of strength, protection, and fertility.

While Lahmu and Lahamu may not be as well-known or widely worshiped as some of the other deities in the Babylonian pantheon, their role in the creation myth is significant in establishing the emergence of the universe and the lineage of the gods.

So now we have the following family tree:

Lahmu and Lahamu
Anshar and Kishar
Anu and Antu
Enlil en Ninlil

An excerpt from Tablet 1 of the Enuma Elish, translated by Stephanie Dalley, where Lahmu and Lahamu are mentioned:

“When in the height heaven was not named, And the primeval Apsu, who begat them, And chaos, Tiamat, the mother of them both, Their waters were mingled together, And no field was formed, no marsh was to be seen; When of the gods none had been called into being, And none bore a name, and no destinies were ordained; Then were created the gods in the midst of heaven, Lahmu and Lahamu were called into being.

I asked for another cite:

Here is another excerpt from Tablet 1 of the Enuma Elish, translated by Stephanie Dalley:

“Out of the Deep was Apsu engendered, And Tiamat, she who bore them all, who formed all things, Made in addition weapons invincible; she spawned monster-serpents, Sharp of tooth and merciless of fang; With poison, instead of blood, she filled their bodies. Fierce monster-vipers she clothed with terror, With splendour she decked them, she made them of lofty stature. Whoever beheld them, terror overcame him, Their bodies reared up and none could withstand their attack. She set up vipers and dragons, and the monster Lahamu, And hurricanes, and raging hounds, and scorpion-men, And mighty tempests, and fish-men and rams; They bore cruel weapons, without fear of the fight. Her commands were mighty, none could resist them; After this fashion, huge of stature, she made eleven [kinds of] monsters.”

In this passage, Lahmu and Lahamu are mentioned as “monsters” that were created by Tiamat, the mother of all the gods, along with other fearsome creatures like vipers, dragons, and scorpion-men. This passage emphasizes the monstrous nature of these early deities and the chaotic state of the universe before order was established. However, in later parts of the Enuma Elish, Lahmu and Lahamu are depicted more positively as the parents of Anshar and Kishar and as the first step in the establishment of the hierarchy of the gods.

The first thing that came to mind was the creation of the universe, constellations, and planets.

  • Monster-serpents = Asteroids / universes
  • Monster = planets
  • Vipers and dragons = Galaxies

Hurricanes, and raging hounds, and scorpion-men, And mighty tempests, and fish-men and rams = Constellations/universes

Here is the full translation of the first of 7 tablets

122. [And hurricanes], and raging hounds, and scorpion-men,

123. And mighty [tempests], and fish-men, and[rams];

Let’s see where this goes, I asked the following:

Which constellation is referred to as scorpion men?

The constellation that is sometimes referred to as “scorpion men” is Scorpius. In Greek mythology, Scorpius represents the scorpion that was sent by the goddess Gaia to kill Orion. After Scorpius succeeded in stinging Orion, both the scorpion and Orion were placed in the sky as constellations by the god Zeus. In some versions of the myth, Scorpius is depicted as a creature with both a human torso and a scorpion’s tail, hence the reference to “scorpion men”.

Which constellation is referred to as mighty tempests?

The constellation that is sometimes referred to as “mighty tempests” is Auriga. In Greek mythology, Auriga represents the charioteer, who was often depicted as a hero with great strength and power. One of the myths associated with Auriga involves his ability to control the winds and storms, hence the reference to “mighty tempests”. According to the myth, Auriga was able to harness the power of the winds to control the weather and protect his people from harm.

Which constellation is referred to as fish-men?

The constellation that is sometimes referred to as “fish-men” is Pisces. In Greek mythology, Pisces represents two fish, who were placed in the sky by the goddess Aphrodite to honor their bravery and devotion. According to the myth, the fish were able to save the life of the goddess and her son Eros by carrying them to safety across a river. In some cultures, Pisces is also associated with fish-tailed deities or mermaids, which may have led to the reference to “fish-men”.

Which constellation is referred to as rams?

The constellation that is referred to as “rams” is Aries. In Greek mythology, Aries represents the golden ram that rescued the siblings Phrixus and Helle from being sacrificed by their stepmother. The ram carried the siblings away to a distant land, but Helle fell off and drowned in the sea, which is why the area where she fell became known as the Hellespont. In some cultures, Aries is also associated with the ram-headed god of fertility and rebirth, which may have led to the reference to “rams”.

Which constellation is referred to as raging hounds?

In Mesopotamian mythology, the constellation associated with “raging hounds” is Sirius, also known as the Dog Star. The Babylonians and other ancient cultures believed that the appearance of Sirius in the sky heralded the approach of the hot and dry summer months, and they associated the star with heat and drought. In Babylonian astrology, Sirius was also believed to be associated with the goddess Ishtar and was thought to have an influence on matters related to love and fertility.

That’s pretty accurate…

So it feels like ‘hurricane’ is a miss translation. Let’s see

  • Auriga
  • Scorpius
  • Pisces
  • Aries
  • Sirius

Eleven monsters

“After this fashion, huge of stature, she made eleven [kinds of] monsters.”

This is quite impressive, considering that the age of the Tablet 1 of the Enuma Elish is estimated to be around 4,000 years old.

The Enuma Elish is a Babylonian creation myth that was written on seven tablets in cuneiform script. It describes the creation of the world and the struggles between the gods and the forces of chaos. The exact date of the composition of the Enuma Elish is uncertain, but it is generally believed to have been written during the 2nd millennium BCE, possibly around 1700 BCE. Tablet 1 of the Enuma Elish is one of the best-preserved and most complete tablets, and it provides important insights into Babylonian cosmology and mythology.

I asked:

What are the 11 planets in our solar system?

There are actually only eight planets in our solar system, not 11. They are:

  1. Mercury
  2. Venus
  3. Earth
  4. Mars
  5. Jupiter
  6. Saturn
  7. Uranus
  8. Neptune

Pluto was once considered a ninth planet, but in 2006 it was reclassified as a “dwarf planet” by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). There are also many other dwarf planets and minor planets in our solar system, but they are not considered full-fledged planets.


I remember an ancient Annuki story where 2 planets were destroyed, see if I can find it:

Is there a story of the Annunaki wherein planets were destroyed?

Yes, there are various stories and theories about the Anunnaki and their involvement in the destruction of planets or celestial bodies.

One of the most famous stories involving the Anunnaki and the destruction of a planet is the tale of Nibiru, also known as Planet X. According to some theories, Nibiru is a hypothetical planet that orbits the sun on an elongated orbit and passes near the earth every few thousand years, causing cataclysmic events such as floods and earthquakes.

Some researchers and authors have claimed that the Anunnaki were originally from Nibiru and came to earth in ancient times to mine gold and other resources. They allegedly genetically engineered humans to work as their slaves, and some have suggested that they may have had a hand in the destruction of planets or moons in our solar system as part of their activities.

Wow, this is so cool.

We are still missing 2 planets

Can you cite a story of where other planets were destroyed?

  • In Hindu mythology, there is a story about the destruction of a planet called Hiranyaloka, which was home to a race of demons. The demon king Hiranyakashipu had become so powerful that he challenged the gods themselves, and in response, the god Vishnu took on a half-man, half-lion form called Narasimha and killed him. The destruction of Hiranyakashipu and his kingdom is said to have resulted in the destruction of Hiranyaloka as well.
  • In Norse mythology, there is a story about the destruction of the planet Niflheim, which was one of the nine worlds in the cosmos. Niflheim was a frozen, misty world ruled by the goddess Hel, and it was eventually destroyed by the forces of fire and heat from another world called Muspellheim. The destruction of Niflheim is said to have led to the creation of the first beings in the universe, including the giant Ymir.
  • In Aztec mythology, there is a story about the destruction of several planets by the god Tezcatlipoca. According to the myth, Tezcatlipoca grew angry with the people of earth and decided to destroy the planet with a great flood. However, before he could do so, he destroyed several other planets first, including one called Tzontemoc, which he shattered with a blow from his foot. The destruction of Tzontemoc is said to have caused a great rain of fire and debris on earth.

Wow, cool to see that there are different mythologies about the destruction of planets or celestial bodies. This makes me think of the following, did 2 planets in our solar system crash and caused a great rain of asteroids on earth, causing the great flood?

Let’s see what we can find about the Annunaki mythology:

I tried several prompts, but it doesn’t give me anything. OpenAI refers to the theories of Zecharia Sitchin:

According to the theories of Zecharia Sitchin, the Annunaki were an extraterrestrial race from the planet Nibiru, which is said to have a highly elliptical orbit that brings it into the inner solar system once every 3,600 years. Sitchin believed that the Annunaki came to Earth in ancient times, possibly in search of gold, which they needed to stabilize the atmosphere of their own planet. He claimed that the Annunaki genetically engineered early humans to serve as their workers and that they were responsible for many of the technological and cultural advances of ancient civilizations, including the Sumerians, Egyptians, and Mayans.

So, let’s make a side step and see if the other mythologies give away some clues:

One of the stories associated with Tezcatlipoca involves the destruction of several worlds. The Aztecs believed that the universe was divided into several eras, each of which was associated with a particular god. Tezcatlipoca was associated with the fifth era, which was called Nahui-Ocelotl (Four Jaguar), and was believed to have ended in a catastrophic event.

According to the myth, Tezcatlipoca was dissatisfied with the state of the world and decided to destroy it. He caused several planets to collide with each other, which resulted in a great cataclysm. The sky fell, and the earth was engulfed by fire. The few survivors of this cataclysm were transformed into monkeys.

I love that last sentence.

I’m not sure what the base is of this video, but for now, I include it on this page:

Some other interesting things I found:

˹Remember˺ when Joseph said to his father, “O my dear father! Indeed I dreamt of eleven stars, and the sun, and the moon—I saw them prostrating to me!” (Quran 12:4)

Dwarf planets Pluto, Ceres, and Eris

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